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Angry birds time

Catherine MasseyBusselton Dunsborough Times
A single magpie will swoop for six to eight weeks, and will usually return to the same spot each year. Photo: Supplied
Camera IconA single magpie will swoop for six to eight weeks, and will usually return to the same spot each year. Photo: Supplied

The birds with the bad rap are out in full force as the start of August saw us enter the dreaded magpie season.

Breeding up until October, the whooshing magpies will be ready to swoop in with their protective behaviour to anyone who gets too close to their eggs.

Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions Parks and Wildlife Service Regional wildlife officer Melanie Rowley said although its only mid August, she had received enquiries about magpies lingering and building nests.

“Magpies are territorial in nature, they swoop to protect their eggs and young from potential predators during their nesting season.”

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Ms Rowley said a single magpie will swoop for six to eight weeks, and usually return to the same spot each year.

To avoid the dreaded swoop, DBCA recommended changing your route, walking in groups, and avoiding eye contact.

Busselton FAWNA president Suzanne Strapp said although magpies were scary, the public had a moral obligation to try and live alongside them.

“Opportunities to educate and warn the public should be taken, and if a magpie is identified as a problem animal for an area then signage and advising people to keep clear is the best way to deal with it.”

The South West community was encouraged to report any magpie concerns to their local parks and wildlife office.

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