Jetty crew wastes no time

Jackson Lavell-LeeBusselton Dunsborough Times
Email Jackson Lavell-Lee
Busselton Jetty Crew members Kai Ashcroft, Jess Bedford, Jesse Adams, Lilly Henley and Oceana Blake prepare for the annual Busselton Jetty beach clean up day
Camera IconBusselton Jetty Crew members Kai Ashcroft, Jess Bedford, Jesse Adams, Lilly Henley and Oceana Blake prepare for the annual Busselton Jetty beach clean up day Credit: Jackson Lavell-Lee

The Busselton Jetty Crew co-ordinated a foreshore clean-up over the weekend as part of the Tangaroa Blue native debris initiative.

The crew, along with 54 volunteers, collected nearly 3000 pieces of litter. Of the litter, 70 per cent was plastic and 59 per cent were cigarette butts. The State-wide Tangaroa Blue Native Debris Initiative Event only lasted one and a half hours and as such Busselton Jetty Environmental Manager Sophie Teede said more people were always welcome to join in as the event grew every year.

“The high amount of plastic we collected highlights the rise of single use plastics since the 1950’s of which most still exists today,” she said.

“Most of these plastics find their way to our oceans where they become extremely harmful to the natural habitat.”

According to the Mindaroo Foundation – No Plastic Waste only 9 per cent of plastics worldwide have been recycled.

Co-ordinator Jacquie Bullard used waste collected over the winter to create the image of a wave to highlight the impact on the State’s coastline.

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