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Residents concerned at school’s proposed solution to congestion

Chloe FraserBusselton Dunsborough Times
Vasse MLA Libby Mettam, Georgiana Molloy Anglican School principal Ted Kosicki, buildings and grounds sub-committee chairman Steve Disley, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Transport Jim Chown and business manager Pablo Sandor.
Camera IconVasse MLA Libby Mettam, Georgiana Molloy Anglican School principal Ted Kosicki, buildings and grounds sub-committee chairman Steve Disley, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Transport Jim Chown and business manager Pablo Sandor. Credit: Chloe Fraser

The announcement of $200,000 State funding to contribute to the installation of a bus slip lane at Georgiana Molloy Anglican School on Hawker Approach has drawn mixed reactions.

During a visit this week, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Transport Jim Chown announced the State Government would provide $200,000 to the project to create an internal kiss-and-drop zone and increase the number of bus parking bays on Hawker Approach from eight to 14.

Mr Chown said while the State Government did not usually fund projects on local government roads, the minister was committed to ensuring the bus drop-off zone was safe and efficient for students.

“Obviously anyone who lives in the area would like to see efficient drop-off and what has been designed here is a good solution, especially with the transition of children from inside the school to outside and keeping orderly conduct,” he said.

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Residents expressed concerns about the proposed solutions to the school’s parking and traffic congestion problems.

A resident who did not wish to be named said the bus slip lane was an “ill-conceived solution”.

“We are worried about what the school may be proposing and disappointed that they have chosen to not interact with the residents who will be directly affected by any decision made,” he said.

The resident said major concerns in the community included the impact the project may have on safe use of the footpath while buses approached the area, the impact on wildlife with the removal of peppermint trees along the school’s fence line, and the bank-up of traffic on Bussell Highway.

Vasse MLA Libby Mettam said funding would address “the real safety concerns” relating to the congestion of buses and students.

“From the feedback I have received it is overwhelmingly supported by the school community,” she said. “The design of this project and how this project is managed, including consultation with bus drivers and the local community, is a matter for GMAS in liaison with the City of Busselton.”

GMAS principal Ted Kosicki said he had also received positive feedback, but the plans were not yet finalised.

“Our prime concern undertaking the project is the safety of the kids,” he said.

“We’ve got more than 16 buses entering the school and this will possibly increase next year so I think residents will find there will be less congestion with cars which park on the road verge.”

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