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South West women urged to take heed of symptoms during Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Rachel GreenAugusta Margaret River Times
Women in the South West region are encouraged to use Breast Cancer Awareness Month as a reminder to be aware and educated of the common symptoms. 
Camera IconWomen in the South West region are encouraged to use Breast Cancer Awareness Month as a reminder to be aware and educated of the common symptoms.  Credit: Supplied

Women in the South West region are encouraged to use Breast Cancer Awareness Month as a reminder to be aware and educated of the common symptoms.

Cancer Council WA South West regional education officer Julie Rose said many women from around regional WA are known to delay going to a GP or medical clinic when experiencing symptoms.

“In the South West in 2019, 180 women were diagnosed with breast cancer and 21 lost their lives in the region,” she said.

“If you are unsure about a possible symptom you should make an appointment to discuss the change with your doctor, clinic nurse or Aboriginal health worker as soon as possible.”

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“This is particularly important if it has been more than four weeks since you first noticed the change, it’s important to react early to any unusual body changes and to listen to your body and what is right for you.”

Cancer Council WA’s Find Cancer Early campaign encourages those in regional WA to be aware of possible cancer symptoms and if they notice any changes, to act upon them, rather than hoping they will diminish.

Some common symptoms of breast cancer include a lump or hard area in your breast or underarm, change in the size, shape or feel of your breast, breast pain or discomfort, especially if it is only on one side and changes to the nipple.

Breast cancer can also occur with no symptoms, women 50 to 74 who have not experienced any symptoms should take part in a free breast screening every two years.

“Cancer treatments continue to evolve and improve, the chance of successful treatment is higher when breast cancer is found early,” Ms Rose said.

“There is no right or wrong way to check your breasts.”

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