Cleo Smith search: Local helicopter crews join search for Cleo Smith after she went missing on Saturday

Sarah Steger and Phil HickeyThe West Australian
Missing girl Cleo Smith, 4.
Camera IconMissing girl Cleo Smith, 4. Credit: Facebook / Ellie Smith

A local helicopter company has joined the massive search for Cleo Smith, who vanished from her family’s tent at a popular camp site north of Carnarvon on Saturday morning.

Carnarvon based Coral Coast Helicopters, who specialise in aerial mustering and scenic flights, have been helping with the search since Saturday.

Yesterday the company posted a video on Facebook of its crew members searching the coastline and bushland near to where Cleo went missing.

Coral Coast Helicopters staff member Kristine Adcock said on Monday while she did know the family personally she said they were a close knit community who wanted to help the local family in any way they could.

“We have been out there but we’ve been forced to stay grounded this morning cause of the weather,” she told The West Australian.

State Emergency Service crews continue to search bushland for Cleo Smith.
Camera IconState Emergency Service crews continue to search bushland for Cleo Smith. Credit: Phoebe Pin/Geraldton Guardian

“It’s looking like we might be able to later today but we’re also just waiting to hear from police if they need us to get up in the air and help.”

Earlier today wild weather meant the search for the little girl was suspended after wind gusts of up to 75km/h and heavy rainfall wreaked havoc in the Carnarvon area.

But WA Police have since confirmed the land search for Cleo was back in full operation now that weather conditions have eased.

With the search for the four-year-old entering its fourth day, police say they can’t rule anything out, including that little Cleo was abducted and taken interstate.

Inspector Jon Munday sold Sunrise this morning that one of the scenarios investigators were considering was that “Cleo has been taken, and has been removed from the area”.

The harsh terrain of the Blowholes makes the search a slow process.
Camera IconThe harsh terrain of the Blowholes makes the search a slow process. Credit: Phoebe Pin/Geraldton Guardian

“It’s three days down the track now, she potentially could be anywhere,” he said before revealing authorities’ grave concerns had led them to notify interstate police agencies.

“We’re calling for the public’s assistance anywhere. We’re keen to get this messaging out nationally to anybody,” he said.

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